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St John's C of E Primary School

Talking about sounds

Main purpose: To use a wide vocabulary to talk about the sounds instruments make.

 

Story sounds

As you read or tell stories, encourage the children to play their instruments in different ways (e.g. Make this instrument sound like giant’s footsteps, … a fairy fluttering, … a cat pouncing, … an elephant stamping). Invite them to make their own suggestions for different characters (e.g. How might Jack’s feet sound as he tiptoes by the sleeping giant? And what about when he runs fast to escape down the beanstalk?). As the children become familiar with the pattern of the story, each child could be responsible for a different sound.

 

Hidden instruments

Hide the instruments around the setting, indoors or outdoors, before the children arrive. Ask the children to look for the instruments. As each instrument is discovered the finder plays it and the rest of the group run to join the finder. Continue until all the instruments are found to make an orchestra. Musical show and tell Invite groups of children to perform short instrumental music for others. The others are asked to say what they liked about the music. (They will need a selection of instruments or sound makers and some rehearsal time.)

 

Animal sounds

Provide a variety of animal puppets or toys and a range of instruments. Encourage the children to play with the instruments and the animals. Discuss matching sounds to the animals. Give a choice of two instruments to represent a child’s chosen animal and ask the children to choose which sound is the better fit: Which one sounds most like the mouse? What do you think, David?

 

 

Look, listen and note Look, listen and note how well children:

■ choose appropriate words to describe sounds they hear (e.g. loud, fierce, rough, squeaky, smooth, bumpy, high, low, wobbly);

■ match sounds to their sources;

■ use sounds imaginatively to represent a story character;

■ express an opinion about what they have heard.

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